Too Old for Camp, Too Young to Work: 5 Things Teenagers Can Do This Summer

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young children As teenagers get older, the more parents struggle to find a productive yet engaging activity to enroll them during the summer. As parents, it’s totally normal to feel in limbo right now, but there are opportunities available. Union County 4-H composed a list of five things teenagers can do this summer through the Counselors-in-Training (CIT) program.
1. Be a Mentor

As a CIT, teenagers will not only be a part of a day camp setting, but they will also serve as mentors to younger day campers participating in the program.
“I loved being able to interact with them. I learned a lot from the campers, and I hope they learned a lot from me,” Erin Blanding, 2016 CIT participant said.

2. Build lasting friendships
CITs will work alongside each other for at least two full weeks of the Union County 4-H Summer Fun program. Each member can form and foster new friendships with each other.
“I made new friends that I’ll never forget and skills that will never leave me,” Unique Perez, 2015 and 2016 CIT participant said.

3. Gain valuable 21st Century leadership skills
Union County 4-H staff trains participants in leadership, conflict resolution, program planning, goal setting, and many other skills. The members also receive First Aid/CPR training by a certified trainer.
Fiona Walsh, 2016 CIT participant, shared, “It was fun for me to be on the other side of things as a leader, assisting with a camp that I myself was a part of as a student only a few years ago.”

4. Learn something new
As a CIT, teenagers get to learn alongside the campers on various subjects ranging from nature, hiking, robotics, cooking, and many others.

5. Get volunteer experience
CITs are required to volunteer a maximum of 80 hours during the summer equally to two weeks of camp. You can not only boost your college application and resume but serve the program.
“Being a CIT not only is fun, but you can use the hours for thinks like BETA and National Honor Society so it helped me with school as well,” Wizdom Perez, 2015 and 2016 CIT participant said.

To participate in this year’s 2017 CIT Application program, fill out the application and submit it to the local 4-H office by April 7, 2017. For all questions, please contact Crystal Starkes, 4-H Agent, at 704.283.3735 or crystal_starkes@ncsu.edu.