National Seafood Month

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Salmon with Balsamic GlazeOctober is known for many things, from the start of the holiday season to the beginning of fall and cozy sweaters. But did you know that October is also National Seafood Month. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, seafood contains a range of nutrients, notably the omega-3 fatty acids, EPA, and DHA.

Eating about 8 ounces per week of a variety of seafood, the amount recommended for many adults, as part of a healthy diet, can support health. Some types of fish, such as salmon and trout are also natural sources of vitamin D, a nutrient that many people don’t get enough of. 

Several studies have shown that eating fish reduces the risk of heart disease. Try to incorporate more seafood into your diet by eating seafood as a main dish twice a week. If you’re not sure how to prepare seafood dishes, check out Med Instead of Meds for a variety of simple and delicious recipes. One of my favorites has to be the Honey Balsamic Glazed Salmon. This recipe can be done using fresh or frozen salmon and you can get creative with the herbs to make this dish your own. If you’re not a salmon lover, try making some Tuna Burgers or Fish Tacos with Mango Salsa. The possibilities are endless. 

Source: Protein Foods

Recipe & Picture source: Honey Balsamic Glazed Salmon