Savvy Shopper: Meat Label Claims

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packaged ground meat with various meat labels on it

If you’ve ever purchased meat before, you’ve probably seen various labels on meat packaging like grass-finished, natural, antibiotic-free, or organic. The sheer number of different claims can be overwhelming. And there are no definitions on the package to tell you what these really mean. While some label claims sound pretty self-explanatory, some are more ambiguous. Label claims can refer to how an animal was raised, the meat product itself, as well as the quality of the product. So how can you make informed choices about what meat you purchase?

Join us for an interactive webinar, where we take a closer look at various meat label claims. The webinar will be hosted by Aaron Moore, Small Farms Agent in Union, Anson, and Stanly Counties, and Rachel Owens, Livestock Agent in Union County. We will go over definitions, regulations, and how these claims relate to you as a consumer. The webinar will be held on October 21, 2020, from noon–1 p.m. Register for the event at go.ncsu.edu/meat_label_claims. If you need more information, contact Rachel Owens at 704-238-7196 or rachel_owens@ncsu.edu.